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John Adams High School Library Media Center: Find Images

Images

 

Provides access to the Library of Congress collections, which include many primary documents, maps, and photographs. Topics covered include Literature, Presidents, Religion, and African-American History.

 

Search millions of photographs from the LIFE photo archive, stretching from the 1750s to today. Most were never published and are now available for the first time through the collaboration of LIFE and Google.

Copyright FAQ

F.A.Q.

Using Images and Media in Research

Using media (images, audio, video) in papers and presentations adds a dynamic element to your research.  This guide helps you make decisions so you are using the content both legally and ethically.  Below are some frequently asked questions and answers.

Q1.  I'm using an image in my paper.  Do I need to cite it?

Q2.  I watched a documentary and I'll be writing about it in my paper.  Do I need to cite it?

Q3.  I got an image off the Internet that I'm using in my paper.  That's legal, right?

Q4.  What is fair use and why do I have to worry about copyright?


Answers:

1. You should cite images the same way you cite words from an article or book you read.   

2. You should cite videos the same way you cite words from an article or book you read.  For more background on how to cite media, visit UC Berkeley's excellent site dedicated to the topic.

3. If you're acquiring images or other media to use in papers or projects, make sure it's legal.  Fair Use cover uses of images within the confines of the classroom, but it's still wise to know the restrictions of the copyright on the image.  For risk-free image usage, try acquiring images with a Creative Commons license.

4. Fair Use has been defined by U.S. courts for the following: criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, research and parodies.  Learn more about Fair Use hereLearn more about Copyright by taking the University of Texas' crash course here.

6.  You should check with your teacher or a librarian if you have questions about finding images or media for your research.  This guide is a first step in that process and will guide you to quality sites to explore.